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The Bushong United Family Tree
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Welcome to the Bushong United Family Tree Project.

Welcome to the Bushong United Website, dedicated to the genealogy of the Colonial American Bushong family and the preservation of its historical heritage.

However here, you won't find the same genealogy for the early Bushong ancestors, handed down from grandparents or even parents, and if you're not up to challenging old family-lore, then this site may not be for you. Because the Bushong United Website, differs with most of them and can prove virtually every Bushong in America is descended from the same line. That line is the Boschung family, who immigrated to Colonial Pennsylvania in at least three voyages over some 13 years.

Here, meticulously researched and based on facts, the Bushong Tree travels past any other book, website, or genealogist. Over 100 years past. In the real Bushong Tree, the tree ascends at least four more generations, into Germany and ultimately, the beautiful Simmental alpine valley in the Bernese Oberland of Switzerland. If you read, you will see that's where the facts lead and much more about the Bushong-Boschung Family. Otherwise, you can stick with family-lore, or some family genealogist and end your Bushong tree where it is.

Rick Bushong

Any Bushong discussed here and thousands more, are charted in the Bushong United Family Tree at Rootsweb.
Note: these articles, images, and photographs will not be here, online, forever. If any of this information is relevant to your family, copy it, archive it, and back it up!



 
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Barbara Bushong Meixel
Immigrant Daughter of
Nicholas and Magdalena Bushong

I came across an interesting Lancaster County, Pennsylvania genealogy at LancasterHistorical.org, and they were nice enough, for a copy fee, to create the following PDF which is being shared below. Written in 1934, it's titled simply Bear Family. The 81 year old document was made from the older documents, of William Henry Lebkicher and before him, John Bear. Involving several families, it is basically a genealogy of the descendants of Hans Martin Meixel, 1713-1789 and Maria Barbara Juliana Bushong 1719-1805. The Bear family enters into the line, with Martin's grandson, Martin (III) marriage to Mary Bear.

Hans Martin's wife, daughter of Johnann Nicholas Bushong and Anna Magdalena Schaffner, is called Barbara Bushong in the document, but in Martin's will and other documents, she is called Juliana. She arrived, listed as Maria Panchson, with her family, October 17th, 1732 on the Pink "John and William". Juliana was baptized Maria Barbara Boschung, and was born February 4, 1719, in Schmalenberg, Súdwestpfalz, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. In looking through the papers, there's at least one mistake though. It's obvious, that the myth of the French Huguenots had been created before the charts were filled out, because they state that Barbara (Juliana) was descended from them. It's amazing how quickly that myth flourished. At least they don't call them Beauchamp.

The record also lists four of Martin's and Juliana's sons who served during the American Revolutionary War, and the regiments they were in. That's quite a proud record of American Patriots. And a first for me, they also mixed in a little astrology, by adding their astrological signs.

Never the less, they are interesting reading and though not 100% accurate, still provide much early and fairly credible lineage, for Nicholas and Magdalena's daughter, as well as the Meixel and Bear families of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Here are some of the surnames mentioned: Baumgardner, Bear, Bender, Bushong, Eaby, Lebkicher, Meixel, Metzger, Myers, Sheetz, Swope. It is six pages and you can see or download the document, click the link below (opens in new tab),
read PDF

Search for more at LancasterHistory.org

Rick
July 20, 2015

"I'm interested in my Bushong genealogy
but I haven't gotten Serious and joined Ancestry.com..."


Emails sent in to Bushong United from genealogist who are just beginning to study their Bushong ancestry, on more than a couple of occasions, have said something to the effect of "I haven't gotten serious and joined Ancestry.com™ yet...".
 For this, I have to tip my hat to the incredible job Ancestry.com's advertising department or company is doing, if so many people think that joining Ancestry.com is a rite of passage, or necessary to really be serious about your family genealogy.

Ancestry.com, has millions of members, and although there's no fee to join, they do charge a subscription fee to access 99% of their material. The members that I know are very active, in their genealogy and are working on their family trees/charts several times a week, if not more. Ancestry.com encourages and fosters a feeling of community, by the ability to "share" with other members. But that sharing stops, with non-members and as such, little if any information is available outside of their member-only and subscription walls. Because any genealogy done or photos uploaded at Ancestry.com, are not dispersed to the multitudes or the bulk of family members. Because of this it is not archival. Since there is no protection with the information digitally stored on one server, regardless how it's backed-up. Digital archives are only ok if dispersed hundreds of different ways on just as many servers. A single server or company, in the future could crash or maybe be closed down, just as they "retired", MyFamily, MyCanvas, and Genealogy.com. In the case of MyFamily, a lot of genealogical data was lost, and inevitably some from the other sites was too. And besides on this server, Ancestry.com, uses it as teasers to try and entice more subscribers. Because after their members create their family trees, or upload photos, Ancestry.com advertises them, and will make them available only if someone subscribes.

  So the question should be, "Should someone join and subscribe to Ancestry.com?" They offer plans that range from $198 to $398 per year and to help people decide, Ancestry.com offers a 14 day free trial. So if one is disciplined and gives Ancestry.com a serious try for 13 or 14 days, then they should have a good idea, if it is worth the price. I joined on the trial program and for 13 days I explored what they had to offer. I was specifically in search of photos for the Bushong Photo Album. There were around 150 or so member's photographs of early Bushongs and they had kept teasing me with them, showing tiny little images purporting to be Bushongs. Aside from that, I also wanted to explore their documentation for Bushong and some of my other lines of interest.

Well I was able to copy most of the member's photos, and they do have nice digital trees and a couple of other nice features, for instance, a nice overlay, to help read census records. But census records are available publicly at FamilySearch.org. Then, there were glitches on their site, in their search page, that would just "go dead" after a click or two. It was quite tedious. And of their Bushong documentation, when checked, I found they had much less, actually a lot less, than I'd already found elsewhere. Possibly reflecting this, the Bushong trees I saw, once I had access, frequently had incorrect or outdated information, with for instance the immigrant Bushong family. Many, but not all, were calling the Bushongs French Huguenots, who descended from Beauchamp. It seemed that within the Ancestry.com community, that many members, just swapped and spread the same old misinformation between themselves and never look for any new sources.

So for me, aside from the photos that members had given them, Ancestry.com, was no help. And if you'll read the articles here, you'll see I was able to create the world's largest Bushong database and chart virtually every Bushong in the United States, all the way back to Switzerland, without any help from Ancestry.com. And finally, considering that publicly, all they have to say about the Bushong surname is this??
    Bushong Name Meaning Americanized spelling of French Bouchon, a habitational name from a place in Somme, so named with the personal name Buccius + Gallic duros ‘fortress’, or a topographic name for someone who lived in an area of bushes, from Old French bousche ‘bush’. Possibly an altered spelling of German Buschang, which is of Slavic origin (see Bushek). read it
It's information that has absolutely nothing to do with virtually any Bushong in the United States, and nothing to do with the grand Colonial American Bushong Family. It makes the rest of what they say, hard to take as credible. But you decide for yourself, you can try them for 14 days, here... Ancestry.com™. By the way, they didn't make it too difficult to unsubscribe or quit, which I did on the 13th day.

Rick
July 19, 2015

A Swiss Bushong
Coat of Arms

There is obviously a desire by most people, charting Bushong Family to visually represent ancestors in their trees, where there is a place for it. Digital trees, though not archival, are an excellent place to display, images like personal photographs, which of course, would be top priority, but in lieu of that, tombstone photos, wills or paper, signatures or in some cases, a coat of arms. Any of these would be correct and a welcome addition to list, catalog, and display as part of the heritage of an ancestor's. All except the coat of arms for Bushong. The Bushong and their ancestral Swiss Boschung line, never had a coat of arms. read article Also it would seem logical that, in order for someone to earn a coat of arms, they actually had to "bear arms". But the few original Boschung lines of Switzerland were inevitably a peace loving family. As such, there is no record or mention of them at arms anywhere, (except from memory, one Catholic mercenary from Jaun), until the American Revolutionary War, long after the age of heraldry.

It's true they never had a coat of arms, though there is still interest in some kind of image to represent them. But possibly there is one that is, less incorrect? A coat of arms or a crest that could represent the Colonial Bushong Family? So, based on the red and white colors of their Fatherland, Switzerland with their traditional cross, four crests with the following variations have been prepared.

                       


There are already three or four different versions of the incorrect French coat of arms, being used, by many of those charting Bushong, which would probably make our Bushong ancestors roll over in their graves. So to establish and standardize a Swiss version, choose a Swiss crest/shield/coat of arms for your Bushong family. Vote for your favorite version, and it might be the one to represent all of the American Colonial Bushong family.

Rick
May 4, 2015

Were the Colonial American Bushongs
German-Swiss or French?

I have recently picked up genealogy searches again into the many branches of my family tree, mainly playing around on Ancestry.com. My mother's maiden name is Bushong and I traced our lineage all the way back to the same Boschongs that you speak of who came to the United States and settled in Pennsylvania.

Your site is the first I'm hearing of the German-Swiss heritage. My grandfather told my mother that we were of French heritage, and everything I had found on Ancestry.com was saying he was born in, married in, and emigrated from France. Is there more information about the Bushongs connection to France?
Lia Lanham
  A tip of the hat to Lia. Thank you for your question to the Bushong United Website. It is a very good question that should be discussed and I will endeavor to answer it.

First, it needs to be mentioned, Boschung is the correct spelling of the surname. The misspelling, "Boschong" with an "ong" is found only a few times in the historical record, written by a few who were unfamiliar with the surname. Meaning, no Boschungs used that misspelling. It's a mishmash of the original name and the anglicized version of its suffix, "ung".

As to the Bushong-Boschung family being from France, there's no doubt your grandfather thought they were from France. In my family, from my great grandmother, all the way down the tree, our ancestors were always the Beauchamp, from France. Where did it come from? It isn't known, but there were several books published as early as 1900 that said so. Possibly that was the beginning of it. Later in 1928, legendary (for the Bushong family), genealogist Mary Feller Wickes, incorrectly identified Jean Buchain, the tailor, and Barbara Foltz de Haguenau, as Hans John Bushong and the progenitors of the line. (see article) Her tree became the foundation for most of Hans John Bushong's descendants. That's surely where the idea of Jean Bushong of Strasbourg and Barbara Foltz, originated. But in the end, her misidentification has been proven completely wrong and so were the books. Though none provided any valid proof, and these mistakes and assumptions became the sources for their descendant's heritage.

And that is what you're seeing on Ancestry.com, genealogy based solely on family lore. They're just filling in their trees from old hearsay. So now, what the majority of Ancestry.com members show, for the line of Hans John Bushong, is some configuration of Jean Bushong-Boschung-Beauchamp born 1692 in Strasbourg, France, and married to Barbara Foltz de Haguenau. Many even sport the French Bushong coat of arms, which is also incorrect.(see article) But in light of more current information, this can all be recognized for what it really is, myths and lore and definitely not any kind of credible genealogy.

In order to become familiar with the current state of the Bushong genealogy, the credibility of the information and sources published on this website and in the Bushong United Family Tree, hosted at RootsWeb.com, will have to be read and weighed against hearsay on Ancestry.com. Starting with the article, The Origin of the Bushong-Boschung Surname. (read article) It shows the first documented Boschung in Switzerland in the 1520's, which really proves it to be a German-Swiss surname. Then, it needs to be acknowledged that there was only one line of Colonial Bushong immigrants, since both immigrants from 1731 and 1732, Hans John Bushong and Johann Nicholas Bushong were related and accept for their father, mentioned below, there were no others. (read article)

But of the claim they were French? As mentioned, there are several books, that call them French Huguenots, however not all books published at the beginning of the 20th century made that mistake. Even Professor I. Daniel Rupp's monumental book, Collection of 30,000 Names of German, Swiss, and French, Pennsylvanian Immigrants, published in 1875, includes John Buschong in the list of Swiss and German Settlers in Lancaster County 1709 - 1730. (read it here, page 438) John Buschong, who has been recently identified as the father to Johann Nicholas and likely brother Hans John, had immigrated from Germany to the part of Chester County, from which Lancaster County was created. He arrived and had secured land, all prior to 1719. (read article) Along with this "elder" John Buschong, it is known that both Colonial immigrants, Hans John and Nicholas, originally settled in Lancaster County. Some of their descendants, through Hans John, still live there. In the May 1909 issue of "The Pennsylvania-German : devoted to the history, biography, genealogy, poetry, folk-lore and general interests of the Pennsylvania Germans and their descendants", they recognized the Bushong surname as Swiss (German-Swiss) and correctly listed it, with their other Swiss and German compatriots, who all arrived before 1735. (read it here, page 201) But further, according to the same book (page 203), there were very few French in Lancaster County. In fact, they note only five French families among Lancaster County's early settlers, two Huguenots, and three French Canadians, none named Bushong, Beauchamp or Boschung.

There is other evidence, of their German-Swiss heritage, including mention of some wills written fully in German, and Hans John Bushong's nephew, Anthony Andrew Bushong stating he was Swiss when he was pressed into the militia in 1746. Though he was probably really born in Germany, he still identified Switzerland as the Fatherland and Swiss as his heritage. But, perhaps most telling of all, is the phrase that begins like this....


"Hier ruhen die Gebeine" (Here lie the bones) ...they carved their tombstones in German.
Full transcription... "Hier ruhen die Gebeine, Anna Eva Bushong, Gebohren den 22 July AD 1733, Gestorben den 19 June AD 1778, Im Ihres Alters 44 Jahre 11 Monathe weniger 3 Tage"
(Here lie the bones, Anna Eva Bushong, born the 22 July AD 1733, Died the 19 June AD 1778 In their age 44 years 11 Months less 3 days)

Anna's 1778 tombstone. Click to enlarge. Photo compliments of M. Campbell.
All rights reserved.
       

Anna Eva Hergard Bushong's stone, (left), in the Salem Evangelical Reformed Church, Hellers, in Lancaster, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, is completely carved in German, as are tombstones of other Bushongs and many other graves. And virtually all begin with the same German phrase, "Hier Ruhen" yet none are inscribed "se trouve ici" or "à la mémoire de"(French for "here lies" or "in memory of"). Anna Eva Hergard Bushong, was Hans Philip Bushong's wife, and though she died over 40 years after Hans Philip's and his parent's immigration to America, German was obviously still his primary language, because he had it carved on his wife's tombstone. Just from the funerary evidence alone the case is overwhelming but also illustrates just how deeply the German-Swiss heritage ran in the Lancaster community. To see Anna Eva Bushong's FindaGrave.com memorial, click here.
  Reviewing the evidence...
  • The Boschung name is in Switzerland in the 1500's
  • Books published as early as 1875 say they were of German-Swiss descent
  • They lived in a German community
  • Their offspring state they were from Switzerland
  • And most convincing of all, they carved their tombstones in German.
If there's any evidence at all that they were French, that could compare with this, it certainly hasn't been seen.

Did the Colonial Bushong ever live in France? It's quite possible, but if they did, then they were German-Swiss refugees, who stayed only a few years. There is family-lore, of an old letter, in the Hans John Bushong family saying they lived in Strasbourg, France for 7 years prior to their immigration in 1731. That would be between 1724-1731, and would put the births of daughters, Anna Barbara Bushong Grimm (1725-1808) and Christianna Bushong (1728-___) in France, if it is true. But the letter hasn't been seen in decades, and has probably been lost. Also, there is evidence that at least one Boschung was living in Strasbourg, Bas-Rhin, France, in 1715, when a Magdelena Boschung, married Hanns Bernard Karle. Her father, Christian Boschung was from Switzerland and was married in 1691 in Saanen, canton Bern to Esther Roschu. Christian has been theorized to be a brother of Hans John and Nicholas. (read article)

However there are a few charted Bushong lines that are actually French, and one of them immigrated to America in the 1880's. They are a distinct line of French Canadians, who according to Canadian Census records, were Catholic. The Colonial Bushong were Protestant, and they immigrated, to get away from Catholics and their oppressive doctrine, so this is inevitably a different line. And since there is apparently a French Bushong coat of arms, that would establish the surname in France before the 1500's and the end of the age of heraldry.(read article) But this Bushong line's name is presumably a metamorphosis of a different French surname, that had been anglicized. Who knows what it started out as, possibly they were the Bushong-Beauchamp of lore?. Never the less England and France in the days of heraldry were "royally" Catholic, and the Colonial Boschung were definitely not French Catholic. Finally, Colonial Bushong DNA has been compared to the French Beauchamp's and it does not match, settling that myth.

So this leaves the Bushong genealogist, be they hobbyist or expert, with no other option but to show their tree is of German-Swiss ancestry. Though in reality whether or not the Bushongs were French probably isn't really all that important to the bulk of them. To them, it's just another blank to fill in, just another name, or another distant maternal line. And that is why it is necessary to question all unsupported assertions and relationships. Though they could be true or at least have a kernel of truth, they are not a good foundation for a credible family tree and if it's published, it's not good for the Bushong Family Heritage.

Rick
April 29, 2015

Abraham Rakestraw
Husband of Lydia Bushong
Daguerreotype Identified!

Finally a positive identification for one of the Rakestraw-Bushong Clan photographs, sold in 2013, out of the Rakestraw-Bushong family for $350.(read article)

While looking through the Bushong photos tucked away on Ancestry.com, I found a photocopy made from a book, of Abraham Rakestraw, complete with a facsimile of his signature. The title of the book, in order to read more and find a better image, was unfortunately not noted. But, from this website, a subscriber, "ljoseph193" (most use the nonsensical names, assigned by Ancestry.com), had copied one of the Rakestraw-Bushong Clan Collection, specifically, the daguerreotype of the old white haired gentleman, and compared it to the photocopy. They obviously noticed the striking similarities, listing him as Abraham Rakestraw.

BUSHONG LINEAGE: Abraham Rakestraw and Lydia Bushong/ Henry Bushong and Sarah Gilbert/ Johannes John Bushong and Eve Dorothea Eckman/ Hans Philip Bushong and Anna Eva Hergard/ Hans and Barbara Bushong, the immigrants.

The Pennsylvanian Quaker Bushong family of Lancaster County, joined with the Rakestraws, in 1834, when Henry Bushong and Sarah Gilbert's daughter, Lydia married Abraham. Abraham was born in 1799 in New Jersey, and died in 1874 in Lancaster County. Since the daguerreotype format had died out very quickly after 1860, if it were Abraham, he would be around 61 years old or younger. But when I looked at the Dag, the old gentleman seemed older than 61, or at least too old to live another 13 years. Though this proved to be in error, because comparing the Dag with the book plate, the similarity was remarkable...

Still, with the harshness of the photocopy it was hard to be positive they were a match. So, to take it a step further, since both subjects were seated virtually alike, I superimposed the two images, and this ghostly image emerged...

Notice, it's visible where the two images don't match, for instance, the different hand positions, but the faces match exactly. On all features, it's a dead match, meaning our daguerreotype has been identified. But now the next question is, from the collection, could the older, matronly woman, who appears to be the wife, be Lydia Bushong? Henry Bushong and Sarah Gilbert's daughter, born in 1807 and aged 53 or younger? She doesn't look much like Henry, but we don't have her mother, Sarah's photo, so let's compare her with a potential brother, Jacob...
Lydia Bushong Rakestraw? Click to compare.

Jacob Bushong and the woman look a lot a like, and look like brother and sister to me. But you decide. If true, more of the photos in the "lost collection" may be identified.

Rick
March 29, 2015

Out of the Shoebox
Samantha V. Rice Bushong
What a Beautiful Photo


Some may have noticed a beautiful new photograph added to the Bushong United Photo Album. In full color, with such a beautiful young woman, it certainly stands out...
    A tip of the hat to Jane Aronholt, for sharing her Ancestry.com tree, where Samantha's photo was found, it had been previously added there, by Jeffrey Adams.
BUSHONG LINEAGE: Samantha V. Rice, wife of John Stout Bushong/ James S. Bushong and Drusilla Stout/ George Bushong and Lydia Rush*/ John Bushong and Jennette Young Summers/ Anthony Andrew Bushong and Catherine Bushong/ Johann Nicholas Bushong and Magdalena Bushong, the immigrants. *traditional lineage.
Samantha Violetta Rice was born in Putnam County, Ohio, Feb 21 1843. In 1864, she married John Stout Bushong, and they had seven children. Tragically, Samantha was killed in 1894, by a runaway horse, in Lockney, Floyd County, Texas.

The image of Samantha is obviously a copy of an earlier photograph. The copy was made likely in the early 1900's and hand-colored. Judging from her age in the photo, she was quite young, certainly younger than twenty? She was nineteen when she was married. So the original photo would have been taken before 1863. If I had to hazard a guess, looking at the detail and the tonal range, the original was an ambrotype and the copying and oil coloring was masterfully done. But then, when it is considered that, one of her children was none other than, John Chester Bushong, the well known and award-winning photographer, it all becomes clear.read article The copy is the work of Chester, and it was surely by his hand that such a beautiful, hand-colored image could have emerged. Chester protected his mother's one-of-a-kind ambrotype, by making copies on more modern photo-paper, that for one, wouldn't break, and then they could be dispersed to other family members. In a sense, he was bringing the photo out of a shoebox. And it's a good bet that he got the color of his mother's eyes, hair and even her ring, correct.

It's only one photograph from Ancestry.com's "shoebox", but at least it's now publicly available for descendants. If Samantha is an ancestor of yours, take a good copy of it, back it up, and print it, if you can. It's just too valuable and important to be lost from yours or the Bushong family heritage.

Rick,
March 14, 2015

Bushong Heritage
Lost is Lost
Online or in a Shoebox


I've been sharing my photos for over 30 years and have always encouraged everyone to do so. So it always is amazing when others won't. Genealogist, Damon Hostetler can attest, he and his mother, Bette, got their original copies of the George Bushong and Lydia Rush photographs from me, in the 1980's, back in the days of the Bushong Bulletin. So did many others. Because of sharing, George and Lydia's photos can be found, all over the web, and many many people have them. The result is, they are now safely stored on literally hundreds of servers, hard drives, and memory sticks, not to mention, in books and framed on walls. This is as it should be, since George and Lydia are ancestors to over 10% of the Bushong family tree, with almost 650 descendants, and many more still to be identified. George and Lydia's photographs are part of their heritage and it's available to each and every one of them, because after all, it really belongs to all of them.

In order to collect, catalog, and preserve the Bushong photographic Heritage in the Bushong United Photo Album, the web has been literally scoured, seeking photographs of the all of the first six generations, from immigration. Luckily there have been around 150 over 300 photographs of Bushong ancestors and their spouses located. All have been restored and corrected, (where needed) and displayed in the album for every single descendant to have and enjoy and pass on to their children.

But there are many more hidden away in shoe boxes, and other places, such as online. Many of these are hidden behind false walls created by, for example, Ancestry.com and Facebook. It's hard to fathom, people paying Ancestry.com for a subscription, then giving (uploading) their photos, only for Ancestry.com to turn around and use those photos to make money, by only allowing paid subscriptions to see them. Just checking, there are nine or ten different Ancestry.com members sporting George and Lydia's portraits, and they won't let anyone see them unless they pay the subscription. By the way, George (of George and Lydia), was not named, nor never used Washington for a middle name. It's just careless genealogy to add on Washington to every George from the era, without a middle name. Continuing, Facebook is not much better. First they down size (maximum height or width, 520 pixels), and degrade the images, then, even more amazing, they own any image you give them (upload) to do what ever they choose in the future, even if it's deleted. Even then, it's not public and requires membership, then after that, there are private groups that won't share.

The result is, these photographs of Bushong Ancestors, are locked behind walls. They need to be made public, because they belong to so many descendants and for that matter, all the Bushong family. As Secretary of State Edwin Stanton said of President Lincoln shortly after his death, April 15, 1865, "Now he belongs to the ages".source So do these photographs. They are the bonafide heritage of thousands of descendants. In light of this, to knowingly keep them hidden behind the false subscription wall of Ancestry.com or Facebook's private members-only walls, is irresponsible and no better than putting them in a shoebox.

Here's a few examples from Ancestry.com From the descriptions and the parameters of the search, they all appear to be among the first six generations of Bushongs and just what the Bushong United Photo Album is looking for. This is how they are described...
  1. Elizabeth A Bushong Archer Photo (Portrait) Elizabeth Ann Bushong (born 1817)
  2. mary m snapp (Portrait) Mary Margaret Bushong (born 1820)
  3. William Harvey Zirkle and his mother Helena Bushong Zirkle (Portrait) Helena Bushong (born 1821)
  4. Harriet J Gillam 1824 1900 (Portrait) Harriet J Bushong (born 1824)
  5. William Davis And Elizabeth White Bushong (Portrait) Location: Metcalf, KY William Davis Bushong (born 1832)
  6. Hannah E (Portrait) Hannah E. Bushong (born 1837)
  7. The families of James Bushong (seated left-center) and Bill Bushong (right-center). (Portrait) James Sanford Bushong (born 1848)
  8. Frederick Keller Bushong (Portrait) Location: Arlington, OH Fredrick Keller Bushong (born 1849)
  9. Bushong (Portrait) Eva Anna Bushong (born 1852)
  10. CEM46849986_115429759410 Bushong, Luther father of Amelia Cornelia Amer Bushong Leinweber wife of Emil (Portrait) Luther D. Bushong (born 1852)
  11. Leah Nora Bushong Fox 1856-1930 (Portrait) Leah Nora "Lillie" Bushong (born 1856)
  12. Eliza Brady (Portrait) Eliza Jan Bushong (born 1864)
  13. emma bushong (Portrait) Location: Minneapolis, Hennepin, Minnesota, USA Emma J Bushong (born 1864)
  14. Thomas J. Bushong and Anna Bushong (Norris) (Portrait) Death: 1936 Thomas Jackson Bushong (born 1864)
  15. Aunt Sally Bushong Whitley (Portrait) Sallie Camilla Bushong (born 1870)
  16. JT with parents (Portrait) John Tolbert Bushong (born 1872)
These are just a few they have listed, all hidden away, from hundreds and hundreds of Bushong descendants and thousands of Bushongs. Here's another example, talking about the purported Anderson M. Bushong ambrotype, and photos of him...
In every photo that we have of Anderson M. Bushong, he is sporting a beard as are all his other immediate male relatives. The photo shown at Perry Adams is clean shaven and would be too young a man for Anderson at the time the photo was taken. Anderson would have been in his mid 30s when the photo was taken. This guy looks to be in his 20s. Anderson M. Bushong was right handed and this young man is left handed. We have all concluded that this is not Anderson M. Bushong. Gloria Neiger Bushong Boschong[sic] List: here
In every photo? How many are there? Now it is claimed, there are several photographs of Anderson M. Bushong, which could be shared to at least help identify this beautiful ambrotype, not to mention, they are also part of Bushong Heritage. What other Bushong images are hidden away from the Bushong Family? Those images and the heritage they represent, could be lost, unless they are protected by making them public.

As to the ambrotype, those who are familiar with old photographs understand, that the subject in the purported Anderson photograph is not necessarily left handed. Because, all ambrotypes, Tintypes and daguerreotypes are viewed backwards or reversed. So in the photo, the gentleman was actually holding the knife in his right hand, not left, which obviously could indicate he was right handed not left. Carte de visite's (CDV's), cabinet photos and all other photographs on photo paper are generally right-reading, (unless they were accidentally printed backwards). An example of backward images from the glass plate or tintype processes, can be seen when the writing on Civil War soldiers' belt buckles is reversed. Another is when a CDV and a tintype, of same person are viewed side by side, a subject's hair will be parted on the opposite sides. Further, a more subtle example, seen in this ambrotype, notice the jacket buttons on the wrong side. As to the age of the subject, ambrotypes first became available in the early 1850's and were patented in 1854 in the US. source. In 1854, Anderson was only 22 years old. The American Civil War started in early 1861, and the subject in the ambrotype was not in uniform, so he was not yet a soldier and the photo would probably have been made before 1861.

Never the less, I say to Mrs. Bushong as well as Bushong descendants, who may be Ancestry.com subscribers, this is your call to show how important Bushong Heritage really is to you. Bring those photos out of their shoe boxes, in Ancestry's or Mrs. Bushong's cache, and share them by making them public. They are after all, well old enough to be in the public domain. Wikipedia: Public Domain The only way to fully protect them is by dispersing them. Disperse them where they belong, putting them in the hands of descendants. This website is a good start, but not only here, there are other public sites like FindaGrave.com, or even Google's free storage that could hold thousands of your photos (just make it a public album). Even after that, website's come and go, and I've even seen FindaGrave memorials (pages) disappear, with their photos, when they were deleted by the person who created them. So these are just a start, in order to make them available. Then they have a good chance of being found and saved by many people in many places. There's already a place for Anderson's photo (or photo's) here, in the Photo Album. Let the Bushong descendants see them, maybe they can help confirm the identity of the ambrotype being called Anderson Bushong?
?
Anderson M. Bushong
(will Mrs. Bushong share??)
So, I would like to invite Mrs. Bushong and all Ancestry.com subscribers, to share and make their older Bushong photographs public. There's a spot here, for all of them, at least the first six generations. Just click on the Submit History button above, or email me for help.

Thank you,
Rick
March 10, 2015

Bushong Heirloom For Sale!
Anderson M. Bushong Ambrotype?
Update: Sale Stopped

    Note: after being seen on this website, someone has approached the dealers, and they are currently investigating the voracity of their assumption that the subject was Anderson Bushong. Here's the original post with their original advertisement, below.
Is this Anderson M. Bushong?

Another possible Bushong heirloom has left the family, but is not yet lost. It is offered for sale by an antiques dealer in Petersburg, Virginia. Here's their description...
Identified Ambrotype of an Armed Confederate Soldier $2,150
Identified Ambrotype of an Armed Confederate Soldier: This crystal clear, ninth plate ambrotype is believed to be that of Anderson M. Bushong, who enlisted, as a corporal, in Co. B of the 97th Va. Militia. This fine image, housed in a complete case, surfaced recently, directly from the estate of Grace Brubaker. Miss Brubaker was the daughter of John W. and Sallie Bushong Brubaker. Her mother was a Bushong, and a direct descendant of the family that owned the Bushong farm in New Market, (Shenandoah County), Va., site of the famed involvement of the young, VMI Cadet Corps, in combat, on May 15, 1864. Grace Brubaker’s great-grandparents were Anderson M. Bushong and Elizabeth A. Swartz; her mother, Sallie Bushong, married a Brubaker, whose family was from the next county (Page). As there is no direct relative from Miss Brubaker’s father’s side who served in the Civil War, the most reasonable supposition is that this image is that of Anderson M. Bushong.

Bushong appears, in the image, wearing a fine, homespun suit and matching vest, white dress shirt and black tie. He holds in his hand, a sizable, D-guard style Bowie; the knife’s D-guard has been gilded, leading one to assume that it was originally brass. This is a great, armed image, showing an earnest, young farmer, once owner and occupant of the house and land that was a focal point during one of Virginia’s most significant of battles.

Perry Adams Antiques - PO Box 2317 - Petersburg, VA 23804 - (804) 310-6098
Website: Perry Adams Antiques

See it here: Perry Adams Antiques. (Add removed)
In the original case.
This is a restored version, and the image has been digitally processed.
Original cased scan, Original scan no case.

BUSHONG LINEAGE: Anderson M. Bushong/Jacob Bushong and Sally Strickler/ Henry W. Bushong and Barbara Lohr/ Hans Philip Bushong and Anna Eva Hergard/ Hans John and Barbara Bushong, the immigrants.

Checking their Bushong and Brubaker lineage, they are correct. Anderson, 1832-1904, was indeed a great grandfather to Miss Grace Brubaker, and it's very reasonable that she would have his photo. He would have been about 29 years old when the war started, the person in the photo looks young, but could still be 29, if the photograph was taken in 1861? A weapon in a photo, makes an armed Civil War photo, and they always command a premium price, as do Confederate photos, but with no uniform, it could be less?

Rick
March 3, 2015
1928 A Myth Begins
Barbara Foltz de Haguenau
Wife of Jean Buchain

Archives et Bibliotheque,
de la Ville de Strasbourg, France
9 Nov 1928
Madame Mary B. Wickes, Postmistress,
New Market, Virginia
Madame,

    In answer to your letter which has been transmitted to us by the City Hall, we have made searches in the registers of the people in the 18th century including the people emigrated to Strasbourg. We have found there only one family responding almost to the name in question. Jean Buchain, a tailor, a native of Canton, Guienne (probably Condom), Department Gers. He acquired, the 5th of December 1722, the right cited for himself, his wife Barbe Foltz de Haguenau and four children by name, Michel, Andre, Pierre, & Barbe. The difference in orthography does not oppose itself to the identity of that family which you are searching, only the names of the children could cause some doubt. On the contrary, there is a possibility that the three boys mentioned are dead or did not emigrate with their parents, and that these, after their arrival at Strasbourg, had the three other children which you named.

    Now I could, if you desire, make the researches necessary in the registers of baptisms from 1722 to 1731, and in this case, I would beg you to send us the amount to defray expenses, amounting to 50 francs, without guarantee, however, for positive results.

Please except, Madam, the expression of my distinguished sentiments.
The Director,
Josep Delabache.
I was looking through the "Bushong Archives" and came across some of Mary Feller Wickes' research papers. The letter, above was interesting because, it was the basis for Barbe Foltz de Haguenau as the wife of Hans John Bushong IV. The four unnamed children the letter mentions, must be the four listed on the ship's passenger list, with Hans and Barbara Boschung, when the Brittania arrived in 1731, "Magdelena, Hans Philip, Anna Barbara, and Christina ."

Many genealogist, today, haven't heard of Mary Bessie Feller Wickes, (1866-1966), who was the daughter of Samuel W. Feller and Martha Ann Bushong and granddaughter to Henry M. Bushong and Mary Ann Wendel. Mrs. Wickes was one of the pioneering Bushong genealogists. Her old charts and genealogy, are the basis for much of the Hans John Bushong IV, family tree, as it is known today. And it was done without computers and the internet, so it's understandable when there's a mistake or two. And there are some mistakes, some of which became myths that are even still, attributed to family lore. But it's always good to know where the myths come from.

BUSHONG LINEAGE: Mary Bessie Feller/ Samuel W Feller and Martha Ann Bushong/ Henry M. Bushong and Mary Ann Wendel/ Andrew Bushong and Elizabeth Calvert/ John Bushong V and Elizabeth Sprenkel/ Hans John Bushong IV and Barbara Bushong, the immigrants.

Mrs. Wickes' greatest divergence from the current state of Bushong genealogy was, she believed that her line of Bushong were descended from Jean Beauchamp,(see her chart below) for which there has never been any evidence, past being erroneously published in a book then repeated. This letter is another example. In it, it was overlooked, that three of the four children's names, Michel, Andre, Pierre, don't match. Also, daughter Anna Barbara wasn't born until 1725. Further, the name Michel, by itself, is glaringly out of place, within the family line, and does not first appear until 1942. But more importantly, Jean Buchain's trade of tailor, is probably the biggest discrepancy. A tailor is a skilled trade, and the work is far different than that of farmer, which Hans John Bushong IV, was. It paid more, too, so it makes no sense that the immigrant would give up his trade. Jean Buchain is obviously a different person than our John Hans IV. And since this letter is the only source for Barbara Foltz de Haguenau as the matriarch to this family line, then the idea is completely without merit.. Barbara's maiden name remains unknown and Barbara Foltz is just another Bushong myth. Also without basis, is John Bushong being called Jean. There has never been any evidence to support this nickname. It was always Hans or John. By the way, I looked up how much 50 francs was, and in 1930, it was less than $2.00 US. source.

For historical interest, here's a few more pages from Mrs. Wickes' Bushong genealogy papers...


    From PA Archives,   

  A Bushong story with chart. 

Mrs. Wickes' family chart.

Notice the hand written chart at the bottom of the center page. There is more written about Mrs Wickes, here,
and she has a memorial on Find a Grave,   Mary Bessie Wickes.

Rick,
February 6, 2015

Anton Andreas Boschung
the Correct Name Order
Anthony Andrew Bushong

    Studying the German Naming Patterns, for the Beyond Bushong article about Nicholas Bushong and his ancestry, it became apparent that the modern American naming pattern of a call-name usually being the first name, does not hold true with German naming traditions.

  In Andrew's day, it was the second or middle name that was used as a call-name. The fact that his father Johann Nicholas Bushong, went by Nicholas is another indicator of this. So Andrew's proper name order should be Anthony Andrew Bushong, or in German, Anton Andreas Boschung.

Those charting Andrew should use this order. For further reading, Charles Kerchner's comprehensive article can be read here.

Rick,
January 16, 2015

Jane D. Pace Hutchens Bushong
2nd Wife of
John Andrew Bushong

John Andrew Bushong, 1792-1883, was born in Montgomery County, Virginia, the son of George Bushong and Martha Davis. His first wife was Feraby White, 1795-1858. After she died John Andrew, married the widow Jane D. Hutchens, in 1862. At the time, John Andrew was 72 years old and Jane was 55. Jane's maiden name was Pace, and this is verified by a son, Alva Thompson Hutchens' 1917 Tennessee death record. But there has been some question about whether she was divorced or separated from John Andrew and also, when she died.

BUSHONG LINEAGE: John Andrew Bushong and first Feraby White and second Jane Hutchens née Pace/George Bushong and Martha Davis/ Anthony Andrew Bushong and Catherine Bushong/ Johann Nicholas Bushong and Magdalena Bushong the immigrants
    There are no census records for Jane after the 1870 census and I believe she died in 1872 or 1873 since John Andrew Bushong stated in the 1880 census that he is a widower. The only other explanation is that they were divorced or separated. But if so, where is she in 1880?
    Jane D. Pace Born: 21 January 1806, d/o Langston Pace and Amelia Nunn, Kentucky
Died: 30 November 1872 {No evidence of her being alive after the 1870 census}...
...If someone can find a census record for her to prove she was alive in 1880, then I will revise her death date.
Boschong[sic] List
Being missed for the census is not unheard of and it could be possible with Jane. Just as in the 1880 census, John Andrew was away, visiting his son, when the census taker came, Jane could have been away from home too. Possibly she was visiting one of her many children by her former husband, William G. Hutchens. Moreover, John Andrew being listed in 1880 as a widow, could be wrong and doesn't necessarily mean he and Jane were divorced or for that matter separated. He and Feraby were married for over 38 years, and since John Andrew was staying at his son's house, possibly his son still thought of him as widowed. The point is many things could have happened. The fact that she's listed as his widow for a widow's pension from John Andrew's War of 1812 service, pretty well settles the divorce speculation. And this pension form would have more plausibility determining a date of death than guessing because of a missing census record.
 
click for full form
               
•Sold (Soldier's) 1st wife Phereby W____?
•Maiden Name of Widow: Jane D____? (1st Mar (Marriage) Hutchens)
•Marriage of Soldier and Widow: December 23 or 25, 1862
•Death of Soldier: June 26 1883, Monroe County, Kentucky
Death of Widow: Nov 10 1893
But this previously published transcription, of an affidavit about her death, would surely support a case for their still being married as well as, account for her date of death. It's given by Jane's son, Perry Hutchens, and it calls her John Andrew's widow, not divorcee...
   

Death of Widow: Jane D. Bushong
Pension Case #6923
Greetings: Cumberland County Kentucky
23 May 1893
Honorable Secretary of the Interior - Washington District of Columbia
Dear Sir:
At the death of Jane D. Bushong, widow of John alias Andrew Bushong, late as soldier of the War of 1812, There were about $46 dollars due her however on the day of her death a check came for $36 which was returned. This check were due her on the 4th November 1893. She died on the 30th of November 1893. I have bore the expense of the last illness and burial. Please send to me proper blanks and instructions for the collection of the accrued pension.
I am truly yours.
P. F. Hutchens
Source: Boschong[sic] List

Along with her husband, William G. Hutchens, Jane is buried in the small Pace Cemetery, in Cumberland County, Kentucky. It's on land that originally belonged to her parents, Langston and Amelia Nunn Pace, who are also buried there.

Rick,
January 15, 2015

Jackson Bushong
Son of George Bushong and Lydia Rush
And His Three Wives

At the prompting of an inquiry, I took a look at Jackson Bushong, son of George Bushong and Lydia Rush in the Bushong United Family Tree and it revealed some discrepancies and an interesting connection...
I have been looking at your Roots Web pages and see that Jackson Bushong, b. 1815, was married twice. His first wife's name is given as Eliza Cole, and his second wife's name is given as Elizabeth Russell. Have you ever seen anything to link your Jackson with Letticia Bickham? She was b. abt 1822 in Kentucky to Hugh Bickham (b. 1770) and Elizabeth Parker, who moved their family to Logan Co., Ohio, later in the 1820s. I am trying to track down any evidence to support a claim, passed down in my family, that Letticia married a Jackson Bushong. Is evidence solid for Jackson's first marriage to Eliza Cole solid?
    First of all, a tip of the hat to Lise DeShea for the question and information, because it was shown to be true, that Letitia was a wife of Jackson. She was his second wife, and Jackson was married a total of three times.

BUSHONG LINEAGE: Jackson Bushong/ George Bushong and Lydia Rush/ John Bushong and Jennette Young Summers/ Anthony Andrew Bushong and Catherine Bushong/ Johann Nicholas Bushong and Magdalena Bushong - the immigrants.
    Online, there was only a maze of conflicting information, and I could not find a single chart or listing that had it right. One genealogist repeatedly asserted, a Rachel Johnson was Jackson's wife. But the record shows she was never married to Jackson, rather, she was the wife of Jackson's brother, Jefferson, whom she married in 1858.
  These are the records that prove the wives of Jackson Bushong, a descendant of Johann Nicholas Bushong and Magdalena Bushong. Then from these dates, the parentage of his children, falls into place.
Three marriage records for this Jackson Bushong at FamiySearch.org, (click to enlarge).

                   
                   
Eliza Cole
marriage 1837
Letitia Bickham
marriage 1844
Elizabeth Simmons (née Russell)
marriage 1852

Jackson Bushong, born 1815, Ross County, Ohio, died November 9, 1871, in Allen County, Ohio. He married:
  1. Eliza Cole, born about 1818, Ohio, died before 1844, probably in Ohio.
    married September 3, 1837,
    in Putnam County, Ohio
    • children:
    • Warren Bushong 1841-1905
    • George Bushong, abt 1843 - before 1870
  2. Letitia Bickham, born about 1823, died May 1850, in Riley, Putnam County, Ohio.
    married Dec 2, 1844,
    in Logan County, Ohio
    • children:
    • Eliza 1846-1868
    • Elizabeth M. abt 1848 - before 1860
  3. Elizabeth Rachel Simmons (née Russell), born August 10, 1826, in Ohio, died January 4, 1915
    married March 8, 1852,
    in Mercer County, Ohio
    • children:
    • Martha* 1855-1855
      Daniel. J.* 1857-1859
    • John Wilson 1859-1931
    • Lydia* 1861-1864
    • Sarah E.* 1863-1864
    • Christianna Zelma 1866-1871
*inferred from burial in the same cemetery, with matching stones, but Daniel has no stone photo.
It isn't known what Jackson was doing in Logan County, to meet and marry Letitia, he had family and cousins there, from his Uncle James Bushong, (husband of Nancy McCreary), but it is certainly her. This we can say, because Jackson took her home to the Riley Township, in Putnam County where she died in May 1850. Here she's listed on the 1850 Mortality Schedule from Putnam County as seen at FamilySearch.org.
Line 33, states Letitia died of Consumption (Tuberculosis). She was sick for nine months.
Notice the two other Bushongs listed, both of whom are identified.

Accordingly, a little over two months later, Aug 7, 1850, Jackson is, enumerated in the census, also in Riley, with no wife and four children. His and Eliza Cole's sons, Warren, and George, and his and Letitia Bickham's daughters, Eliza and Elizabeth M.


Which brings us to the connection - Bickham. First, please recall, that there was a proposed brother of Jackson's, Henry Warren Bushong discussed in January, (see article). Henry, was charted by Damon Hostetler, who fails to provide sources. But interestingly enough, Henry's daughter Mary Elizabeth Bushong also married a Bickham.

Mary Elizabeth Bushong, was born, 1851 and died in 1933, first married Jesse Hill, and after he died she remarried a David Lawrence Bickham. They were married April 20, 1918, in Logan County, Ohio. She was 67 and he was 68 years old. David Bickham turns out to be a son of George Washington Bickham whose sister is Letitia Bickham and their parents were Hugh Bickham and Elizabeth Parker. David Bickham is Letitia's nephew and hence Jackson's nephew by marriage.

What does it mean? Well it could be only a coincidence, but if not, this could be a tangible connection between Henry Warren Bushong and Jackson Bushong as well as George Bushong and Lydia Rush. So are Henry and Jackson brothers? Well, it's still very thin on evidence, but the list of associations, and similarities is growing.
  • Henry and two of George and Lydia's known children were married in Ross County, Ohio.
    (as were 10 other Bushong before 1840)
  • Jackson Bushong named a son Warren, (after a proposed brother)
  • The Jackson Bushong- Letitia Bickham 1844 marriage.
  • The David Bickham-Mary Elizabeth Bushong 1918 marriage,
    (a would-be nephew and niece)
  • Damon Hostetler's unsupported assertions
But real proof remains illusive...

Rick
November 29, 2014
The Current State
of
Bushong Genealogy

Genealogy doesn't happen overnight, and in the Bushong family, it has been going on for over a century. Genealogists and family historians who look through old Bushong research, should keep that in mind and consider that all of those years and all of the questions, assumptions, and opinions, have for the better part, been answered or resolved. That said, recent developments in Bushong research, have significantly changed the understanding of this Colonial immigrant family. It wasn't so long ago that most Bushongs believed they were descended from the Beauchamp, who were thought to be French Huguenots. Now, for most Bushong historians, that myth and many others have been dispelled, along with much of the mystery that has surrounded this family.

So that it might be brought into the current state of understanding, here is a list of more recent Bushong genealogical developments and facts..

  1. The Bushong surname, is an anglicized version of the German-Swiss surname Boschung, which is derived from Bosch, with the addition of the "ung" suffix which translates to "descendants of." Read
  2. The family, originated, in Switzerland, probably Canton Bern and migrated, spending a number of years in the Palatinate. Read
  3. Two Boschungs-Bushongs immigrated to Colonial America in 1731 and 1732 and virtually all American Bushongs descend from them. Note: there are a few post colonial Bushong, some who came from French Canada and some who adopted the name in the mid to late 1800's. Read
  4. The Bushongs were of the Swiss Reformed faith. After immigrating a few became Quaker and Mennonite. Read
  5. DNA has linked the two immigrants Hans John Bushong arrived 1731 and Johann Nicholas Bushong, arrived 1732, who are assumed to be brothers. Read
  6. Andrew "Andreas" Bushong, full name Anthony Andrew Bushong, son of Johann Nicholas Bushong, who arrived in 1732, returned to Europe sometime after 1749 and came back in 1754 on Ship Recovery. Read
  7. Johann Nicholas Bushong and Magdalena's daughters lived and had families: Maria Juliana married Martin Meixel and Eva Elisabetha married Michael Swartz. Read Juliana and Read Eva
  8. Johannes John Bushong, husband to Barbara Kreighbaum, is a great grandson of Hans John Bushong and Barbara Bushong, the immigrants, through Hans Philip Bushong Jr. and Margaret Smith. Read
  9. The entire Bushong surname and variant spelling, Bushon, found in the 1930 U.S. Census, has been charted along with virtually every other known Bushong into one large family tree, the Bushong United Family Tree. Read
  10. Theobalt Bosseng, aka David Bosang, was never a Bushong, and this has been proven both with genealogy and DNA. Genealogy and Read DNA
  11. All the other similar sounding names have been proven not related to Bushong. Read
  12. The Bushong surname has a Wikipedia Page, Wikipedia.

Is your Bushong ancestor charted?
Search the world's largest Bushong database... click here


Rick
November 16, 2014



  



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Feature Articles



The Origin of the
Bushong-Boschung Surname

For well over a hundred years, American genealogists, have been documenting and charting the Bushong surname. A name which is derived from a native tongue that most, if not all of them, are completely unfamiliar with - Schweizerdeutsch or translated, Swiss German....
Read More




The 1930 Census
Bushongs Are Charted

In a genealogical charting project, completed in December 2011, the entire Bushong Family as found in the 1930 U.S. Census, was charted state by state, Bushong by Bushong from FamilySearch.org. All the 1930 Census information was entered into a modern and easily searched and archived database, a GEDCOM. The results....
Read More




DNA Proves One
Original Bushong Line

Down through the generations, there's always been family genealogists who believed the Bushong Family, consisted of literally dozens of family lines, with numerous immigrants arriving on American shores in the Colonial period. Then, in 2011...
Read More




The Immigrant
Anthony Andrew Bushong
Part 1: Pennsylvania Years

In 1732, when Andreas Boschung, arrived in a tiny ship in Philadelphia, there was no telling what the future held for him. But this young lad, not yet 16, was to begin one of the two American Bushong family lines. Following a life of exploration in the new world, he would know losses as well as rewards. His often danderous journey...
Read More
Start with Foreword




The Immigrant
Anthony Andrew Bushong
Part 2: Andrew's Return

In America, war began again in 1754. The long simmering problems between Britain, France, and the Indian Nations, including the Delaware and Shawnee, erupted...
Read More



Beyond Bushong Part 1:
Johann Nicholas Boschung
Pennsylvania and Germany

For the chance of new lives, new freedoms and new opportunities, Johann Nicholas Boschung, his wife, Magdalena, and their children, risked it all. They endured intense hardship, hunger and suffering to sail to America, even probably watching a son die on the voyage...
Read More



Beyond Bushong Part 2:
Der Schweizerische Boschung
(A Swiss Family Boschung)


The newly identified, Hans John Boschung (Senior), discussed in Part One, immigrated to Pennsylvania sometime before 1719. As established, he and his wife, Anna Maria, are the parents of Nicholas and brother, John, (Junior). Given this, it is natural to look to the charts with the hope of extending their ancestry...
Read More




Pink "John and William"
Captain Tymperton
and
The Immigrants Voyage

On the west bank of the Philadelphia Harbor in 1732, a small ship, named "John and William" finally pulled along side of the docks and cast its lines. It was very late, and out of eleven ships, that carried immigrants to Pennsylvania that year, it was the last to arrive...
Read More



Voyage of the
Pink "John and William"
Epilogue

The story continues...
the dead and the mutineers...
...the return trip to Lisbon...
...a surprising new career
for Captain Tymperton...
"John and William" as a slave ship and her shocking end ....
Read More



Murder Lurks
on the
Pink "John and William"

In 1732, a long and lethal transatlantic crossing, ended when the Pink "John and William," finally docked in Philadelphia. For the entire voyage, none aboard were aware, that one amongst them was being stalked by more than starvation and disease. None but one, a fellow voyager, whom they trusted. But this voyager was no immigrant, seeking freedom...
Read More




 Land Warrant Survey Maps Lancaster and Dauphin Co. Pennsylvania

Select warrant survey maps, centering around Andrew Bushong and Hans Bushong, from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and Dauphin County when it was created ...
Read More




John Bushong Senior
1825 Ohio Estate Papers

These are the Probate/Estate papers of John Bushong Senior, (1760-1825) whose first wife was Jennette Young Summers and second wife was the widow Elizabeth Breedlove. The collection of documents range from 1822 thru 1825 and up to 1830...
Read More



Jacob Bushong
Daguerreotype Discovered
In Rare Charter Oak Case

I was recently contacted by a Daguerreotype collector, who I'm pleased to announce has discovered and acquired a photograph of one of Henry Bushong (1783-1870) and Sarah Gilbert's (1787-1831) family...
Read More



Bushong-Rakestraw Daguerreotypes
Are Sold!

What a family treasure to lose! Eleven Images from the Bushong Rakestraw Clan were sold On March 9, 2013, at the Daguerreian Society 2013 Symposium Annual Benefit Auction....
Read More




The Sallie Gilbert Hagee
Identified Photo Album

What an exciting find and rare opportunity! Forty-nine newly rediscovered photographs. All in an original and untouched, Civil War era photo album. Also, it's fully identified with a total of 23 surnames! In this world, there are so many old photos without names and so many ancestors, who've never been seen...
Read More




The 180 Year Old Bushong Place,
Roanoke, Virginia

There are three beautiful black and white photographs, taken in the 1930's, of a two story brick house in Roanoke Virginia, titled "Bushong Farm, Salem Vicinity, Roanoke County, Virginia", in the Library of Congress...
Read More



Albert Bushong, Dentist
Doc Bushong, Catcher

Albert John Bushong, DDS, better known as "Doc Bushong" was one of the most famous Major League Baseball catchers of the 19th century, and is one of a few actual celebrities in the Bushong family. He was also a major contributor to the final transformation of the catcher's mitt...
Read More



John Chester Bushong
Photographer

John Chester Bushong was born near Columbus Grove, Putnam County, Ohio, but his quest for knowledge and his passion for photography took him many places. Successful in numerous pursuits, including, Inventor, Entrepreneur, Artist, Musician, Bicycle Racer, Bronco-rider, and Photography, he truly was, a man for all seasons...
Read More



The Front Page
At a Glance


The Front Page listed in chronological order and Feature Articles listed...
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Help Wanted
Want to help? Though a lot has been figured out about the Colonial Bushong family, there is still much that could be done. If you'd like to help, look below at the projects that help is needed.

Credit will be given for all contributions.

Identifying ANCI's

In the Bushong United Tree, this term is added to the first name for those charted who's parents or lineage is not known. There are over 70 currently listed, from dates in the 1700's and into the late 1900's, some could be very easy and some could be extremely difficult.

Care to try your hand? Type in "ANCI" into a search of the Bushong United Tree to see them all.
Searching Church Records

The LDS Libraries have most of the church records, from Germany and Switzerland on microfilm. They are sort of indexed, yet still require reading and interpreting the ancient German script.

This is a targeted approach, and specific places, dates, and people can be provided. There are already researchers working on it, but more are needed.

If you can get to an LDS library, near you and aren't afraid of the old hand writing, contact me so the searches can be coordinated.

Rick
Finding Old Photos

Old photos are extremely rare and important to the Bushong heritage. Bushong United is collecting them for all Bushongs through the sixth generation from the immigrants. Some are hidden in shoeboxs and others behind false walls at Ancestry.com or Facebook secret groups. These are so important that any means necessary should be used to bring them into the public Bushong Heritage and protect them.

Want to know if a photo is from the first six generations? Email me or search the Bushong family tree, for the immigrants, Hans John Bushong or Johann Nicholas Bushong, then select the "Pedigree" view and count how many generations to the immigrant. If it's six, including the immigrant then there's a place for it.
Filling in the Blanks

The Bushong family tree has thousands of individuals in it. Most of the names are documented with some census or other civic records, and possibly Find a Grave memorial's copied into it. But some, mostly from previously documented lines, are blank in the notes, with no proof provided. Though the relationships are probably correct, the proof should be also added to there notes.

If you find one like that and would like to help, from FamilySearch.org or any other suitable place, copy and paste their civic records into one email, and send it so it can be included in their notes.
Find John Bushong's
Pre 1719 Warrant

If Daniel Rupp can find it,
so can we...
It stands to reason that if John Bushong's (III) Lancaster land warrant was on the 1719 tax list that Daniel Rupp transcribed into his book, then the list or possibly the "early warranties" list, can be found again. They often have details.

Possibly it is even online at the Pennsylvania Historical & Museum Commission website,here. On the other hand only part of the early warranties available on line, so it may require a visit.
  

  


  

  

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